February 8, 2001 | www.radionewsline.ku.edu

Audio

Schrodt is available for interviews through Feb. 19. Call 785-864-9024.

Note: Jim Pilch, a 1994 KU graduate, was a radio operator with the 410 Evac. Hospital in Saudi Arabia during the war. The defense department just notified Pilch he may have been exposed to a nerve agent.

Jim is currently laboratory director for KU's Tertiary Oil Recovey Project. He can be reached at 864-2912 for interviews.



Contact: Frank Barthell, University Relations, (785) 864-8869.

Radio News Line text:
Ten years after defeat, Iraqi's Hussein can still pose problems, says KU professor

FEBRUARY 23 MARKS THE 10TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE BEGINNING OF GROUND WAR AGAINST IRAQ. AFTER A MONTH-LONG AIR CAMPAIGN ALLIED FORCES ONLY TOOK 100 HOURS TO EXPEL IRAQI FORCES FROM KUWAIT

PHILIP SCHRODT, A PROFESSOR OF POLITICAL SCIENCE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS, TEACHES COURSES ON INTERNATIONAL POLITICS AND INTERNATIONAL CONFLICT. HE'S ALSO DONE RESEARCH FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE.

SCHRODT SAYS THE U.S. ESTABLISHED ITS MILITARY MIGHT IN THE GULF WAR, BUT THERE WERE SOME UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES.

Schrodt: "What we learned is how overwhelmingly effective the United States military can be when it's given the opportunity to deploy. A negative aspect is you can't attack the Unites States, you blow up their embassies, you use suicide bombings against their ships." (16 sec.)

THE UNITED STATES ENFORCES LIMITS ON THE IRAQI AIR FORCE. THE SO- CALLED "NO-FLY ZONE" IS DESIGNED IN PART, TO PROTECT THE KURDISH MINORITY IN NORTHERN IRAQ. THE U.S. ALSO LEADS AN OIL EMBARGO AND ECONOMIC SANCTIONS AGAINST IRAQ. SCHRODT EXPECTS IRAQI LEADER SADDAM HUSSEIN TO CHALLENGE THE NEW BUSH ADMINISTRATION, AND THESE RESTRICTIONS, IN THE NEXT SIX MONTHS.

Schrodt: "I would not be at all surprised is we saw some sort of major crisis manifest itself as a challenge to the no fly zone in the north against the Kurds. Or somehow Saddam Hussein could make a major breakthrough with other major Arab states, or possibly the Europeans to really end the embargo." (16 sec.)

DURING HIS CAMPAIGN, PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH PLEDGED TO REVIVE THE GULF WAR COALITION THAT HIS FATHER BUILT BEFORE THE GULF WAR. WITH MANY ARAB COUNTRIES IN THE COALITION, SCHRODT SAYS IT WON'T BE AN EASY TASK.

Schrodt: "There's a great deal of sympathy among the Arab states for the Iraqi people. They don't like Saddam Hussein but they say the Iraqi people are being punished for the crazy policies of their leader (16 sec.)

DESPITE AN OVERWHELMING DEFEAT A DECADE AGO, SADDAM HUSSEIN REMAINED IN POWER. SCHRODT SAYS THERE ARE TWO REASONS. THROUGH AN INTELLIGENCE ERROR, HUSSEIN'S REPUBLICAN GUARD ESCAPED CAPTURE DURING THE LAST HOURS OF THE GROUND WAR. WITHOUT THESE ELITE MILITARY UNITS TO PROTECT HIM, HUSSEIN PROBABLY WOULD HAVE BEEN OVERTHROWN INTERNALLY WITHIN WEEKS OF THE CONCLUSION OF THE WAR. AND SCHRODT SAYS TEN YEARS AGO, THE UNITED STATES AND THE ALLIED COALITION DIDN'T WANT TO SPLIT IRAQ.

Schrodt: "There were significant revolts in both the south of Iraq and the north within weeks after the war, and the United States, or the allied coalition, allowed Iraq to suppress those. Had that not happened, what you essentially would have seen is Iraq split in three pieces at least The United States and I think in particular it's Arab allies wanted instead for Iraq to remain as a counterbalance to Iran. (23 sec.)

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