Skip redundant pieces
KU Home  :  KU News

KU News Release

May 19, 2005
Contact: Lynn Bretz, University Relations, (785) 864-8866.

Citing extraordinary positive results, KU seeks approval of 4th year of tuition plan


LAWRENCE -- The University of Kansas today announced it will seek approval for the fourth of its five-year tuition plan, citing extraordinary positive results in the first three years, including additional faculty, improved classroom technology and enhanced scientific equipment and library resources that have attracted a record number of students and dramatically increased retention rates.

" KU is a better university today as a result of this plan," said KU Chancellor Robert Hemenway. "The academic benefits for our students have been immediate and tangible. We are able to give our students a better education and we have been able to keep the experience affordable and accessible through substantially increased need-based aid."

Among the highlights:
-- Freshman enrollment has increased nearly 5 percent and set records
-- Freshman class minority enrollment has soared 30.5 percent and minority student retention has increased by almost 20 points
-- Enrollment of Kansas freshmen has remained constant at 70 percent
-- The percentage of students with an estimated family income under $36,000 has increased from 14 percent to almost 15 percent
-- Tuition grants for the most needy students -- funded by 20 percent of the new tuition funds -- now provide nearly $6 million a year in aid for nearly 4,700 students
-- Student hourly and graduate teaching assistant wages have increased
-- More than $26 million to date has been invested to strengthen the faculty and fund technology improvements, library support, and operating expenses for schools and departments. Approval of the two final years of the plan will permit an additional $17 million in investments.

Notably, KU tuition continues to be below the national average, ranking 30th out of the 34 public universities in the prestigious Association of American Universities (AAU). Compared with the 11 public universities in the Big 12 conference, KU tuition is 10 percent below the average and nearly $2,400 a year below tuition at the University of Missouri-Columbia.

KU relies on state funds, tuition, fees, private gifts, federal grants and contracts for the funds needed to operate the university. Tuition and fees paid by students account for 23 percent of the university's revenues while appropriations from the state Legislature account for 26 percent. Tuition and fees paid by Kansas residents account for about a third of the total cost of attending KU; for non-Kansas residents, tuition and fees account for nearly 60 percent of the cost, according to the KU Office of Student Financial Aid.

KU's overall tuition proposal for the 2005-06 academic year -- an undergraduate Kansas resident taking 15 credit hours would pay an additional $330 a semester -- was presented to the Kansas Board of Regents today. Final action by the board on tuition plans from all six regents universities will occur during the June 23-24 meeting.

Highlights of the KU proposal include:
-- An increase of $22.05 per credit hour for resident undergraduates, and an increase of $38.65 per credit hour for nonresident undergraduates
-- An increase of $23.65 per credit hour for resident graduate students, and an increase of $40.90 per credit hour for nonresident graduate students
-- An increase of $1,104.80 per semester for resident medical students, and an increase of $1,418.35 per semester for nonresident medical students

Factoring in required fees, which are increasing $7.50 to $294.50 per semester, the average cost for a full-time student in each category (based on 15 hours per semester for undergraduate students; 12 hours per semester for graduate students; and full-time status for medical students) will be:

-- $2,706 per semester for resident undergraduates, vs. $2,368 during 2004-05
-- $6,932 per semester for nonresident undergraduates, vs. $6,346 during 2004-05
-- $2,724 per semester for resident graduate students, vs. $2,433 during 2004-05
-- $6,295 per semester for nonresident graduate students, vs. $5,796 during 2004-05
-- $9,668 per semester for resident medical students, vs. $8,543 during 2004-05
-- $17,546 per semester for nonresident medical students, vs. $16,107 during 2004-05

Although the proposed academic-year increase in tuition and fees for undergraduate Kansas residents is 14 percent, the increase represents less than a 5 percent increase in the total cost of attending KU, which is estimated to be $15,256 in 2005-06.

In addition to the general increases outlined above, seven KU schools are requesting four percent increases in "differential tuition", to be assessed in addition to the basic tuition and fees. An eighth school, pharmacy is seeking to increase the differential tuition for its Pharm.D. professional certification program 25.7 percent to $120 per credit hour

More information online at www.tuition.ku.edu.

-30-

The University of Kansas is a major comprehensive research and teaching university. University Relations is the central public relations office for KU's Lawrence campus.

kunews@ku.edu | (785) 864-3256 | 1314 Jayhawk Blvd., Lawrence, KS 66045